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Medusa Stone review
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Outlanders
Veteran Member
Veteran Member
Posts:163


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6/15/2008 5:25 PM
    I’ve always wondered how much of themselves the author happens to put into a particular character?
     
    Is their favourite character nothing more than a literary extension of themselves, a fantasy that allows them to live out dreams and wishes that would be all but impossible in real life?
     
    I know in my case, even though the character I wrote wasn’t created by me, I was able to put into words feelings I had towards my father, using a character created by a friend of mine, in the novel I co-wrote with him.
     
    So, I guess the answer would have to be yes.
     
    I’ve recently finished the third Jack Du Brul novel Medusa Stone. 
     
    Overall, it was quite an enjoyable tale. But that’s something I’ve come to expect from that author.
     
    In 1989, on its maiden voyage the Medusa Satellite suffers catastrophic damage and begins to fall back to Earth, but not before utilizing it’s camera to take several shots of a region of Northern Africa near the Sudan border.
     
    These photos remained classified and top secret for many years until the information they gleaned fell into the wrong hands.
     
    An inept congressman and a beautiful African woman both attempt to hire Philip Mercer to help them interpret the data – as it could lead to a find of uncountable wealth and prosperity for a small African nation.
     
    But, as is the case so many times, there are other factors at work. The Italians, the Israelis, the Sudanese, just to name a few.
     
    At first, Mercer is hesitant to even consider helping, after having had time to review the data. It’s a long shot, and he’s still trying to get over his recent break-up, and the amount of times his life had been put on the line over the past couple of years.
     
    Oddly enough, it’s these reasons that prompt him to join the quest.
     
    But, when an unknown group take his best friend Harry White hostage and use him as leverage to force Mercer to help, it becomes personal.
     
    Du Brul continues to write amazing adventures. Unlike the first two books of this particular author which involved quite a bit of globe trotting and exotic locals, this novel was mainly set in a small African nation that borders on the Sudan.
     
    And surprisingly enough, the novel does involve the kind of skills that would require an expert geologist.
     
    Also, as was the case with the previous novels, the cast of supporting characters was well written, albeit clichéd. The evil, greedy industrialist, the dragon lady spy who’s loyalties are completely unknown, the fanatic, the politician with everything to lose, and another with nothing but power to gain – all played important roles in this novel.
     
    One thing that really set the novel apart from its predecessors as well was the inclusion of not one, but two ancient myths, both with heavy ties to religion, and their importance to not one, but two nations, and what worldly repercussions would occur if one of the myths was discovered and recovered.
     
    No, I won’t say what either of these myths was, as it would be far too great a spoiler. 
    The only thing I have against the novel is the fact that the hero Philip Mercer has got to be an alcoholic and a bit of a womanizer (even though he only has one new woman per book).
     
    That’s where I get the bit about projecting part of one into the characters that were created.
     
    Am I wrong in my assumption? More than likely, but it is just a personal observation.
     
    Will this fact keep me from continuing to read the series? No way. I’m hooked on Jack Du Brul’s work, and I will continue to read the books as I can find them.
     
    Right now, I have Pandora’s Curse and Deep Fire sitting on my shelf, waiting to be read, but I still have one last novel to find.
     
    Give them a shot if you’ve never read these books, they’re worth it!
     
    5 out of 5
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    DEATHLANDS, OUTLANDERS, EARTH BLOOD, and JAMES AXLER are all the property of Gold Eagle / Worldwide Library, and are used here strictly under Fair Use guidelines.
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